notjustanarmor
iheartmyart:

Gustav Klimt, The Golden Knight (detail of Beethoven Frieze), 1902
In 1902, Klimt painted the Beethoven Frieze for the 14th Vienna Secessionist exhibition, which was intended to be a celebration of Ludwig van Beethoven the composer and featured a monumental polychrome sculpture by Max Klinger. Meant for the exhibition only, the frieze was painted directly on the walls with light materials. After the exhibition the painting was preserved, although it did not go on display again until 1986. The Beethoven Frieze is now on permanent display in the Vienna Secession hall (Austria), Secession Building.
-  Klimt Museum
(via lonequixote)

iheartmyart:


Gustav Klimt, The Golden Knight (detail of Beethoven Frieze), 1902

In 1902, Klimt painted the Beethoven Frieze for the 14th Vienna Secessionist exhibition, which was intended to be a celebration of Ludwig van Beethoven the composer and featured a monumental polychrome sculpture by Max Klinger. Meant for the exhibition only, the frieze was painted directly on the walls with light materials. After the exhibition the painting was preserved, although it did not go on display again until 1986. The Beethoven Frieze is now on permanent display in the Vienna Secession hall (Austria), Secession Building.

-  Klimt Museum

(via lonequixote)

fuckyeahvintageillustration

fuckyeahvintageillustration:

'Die Bücher der Chronika der drei Schwestern / The Book of Chronicles of the Three Sisters' by Johann Karl August Musäus; illustrated by Heinrich Lefler and Joseph Urban. Published 1900 by Verlag von J.A. Stargardt, Berlin.

Description: A fairy tale about a spendthrift king who gives away his three daughters to an enchanted bear, an eagle and a whale fish respectively in return for a centner of gold each. Years later their younger brother sets out to rescue them.

See more illustrations here and the complete book here.